Saturday, December 10, 2005

Culture of Justice

Why doesn't the media latch on to real cases of injustice like this?

Imagine the scene: you're at home, asleep, in the middle of the night. Your eighteen month old is asleep in the house, too. You are awoken by the loud boom of your front door being busted in. Men with guns pour into your house, yelling. You are an everyday, law abiding citizen, just trying to make a place for yourself and your family in the world.

Like many Americans, you fear the theif that comes in the night. You have seen the news about home invasions and what the criminal element does to families. You have a gun by your bed for protection. You bought the gun legally, just like millions of other Americans.

And one night your door is busted down by men with guns, yelling.

In a moment of fear and panic, you shoot back.

You shoot at your assailants, only to hear the words "drop the weapon, this is the police." You comply with these orders, and find out that the man you shot was a police officer. You have killed him.

The police had executed a "no knock warrant," which is defined as "No Knock Warrant, Entry - Police may use a no knock warrant or entry if reasonable suspicion exists that knocking and announcing their identity and purpose would be dangerous, futile or allow destruction of evidence, U.S. v. Banks (2004).

Because they didn't have to announce who they were, you didn't know they were police.

So you did everything you thought you had the rights to do in this country. Things the majority of the Americans support: to own a gun, defend your family from harm, and shoot your assailants if you believe your life or family's lives were in danger.

And for this, you get convicted of homicide and sentenced to die.

The Greek Tragedy of all of this: the police were executing a warrant on a different residence. The domicile was a duplex, but the police didn't know it. They had no warrant to go into this man's home.

Send this news to everyone.

Thanks to DADvocate for the roundup.

Comprehensive opinion at The Agitator

Conservative Glen Reynolds at Instapundit directs us to Silent Running.

And TalkLeft

2 comments:

Dante said...

Don't take this the wrong way, but I had a hard time finding any verifiable facts regarding this story. Your link is a link to a blog that links to a blog to claims to come from media sources but those sources are not disclosed in that blog (the Agitator).

Google News only mentions the Hammer of Truth when searching for info on Cory Maye (NOT a site I'd trust at face value). FoxNews and CNN's searches all give a plethora of links but all of them are fellow bloggers from what I can tell except for the story as it came from WBLT in Jackson (link below). That story does not mention the warrant being for the wrong house or anything about how the police identified themselves.

What the story does mention is that the case was moved from its home county and the jury in the county it was moved to found Maye guilty. However, it is worth noting that according to Google Maps, the two towns in question are only about 30 miles apart (Prentiss, MS to Columbia, MS).

Not to be rude, but is there any verifiale source on the warrant issue or anything else involving this case that can be looked up online?

This is a tragedy if it happened as the blogs maintain it happenend, but without further evidnce I fear we may not be getting the whole story here.

Then again, I might just not be looking in the right places here to get more information on this story.

Story from WBLT 3 in Jackson, MS:
http://www.wlbt.com/Global/story.asp?S=1615000&nav=2CSfKOTG

ruby booth said...

Wanting to have more accurate, detailed, or verifiable sources is almost always a good impulse. Unfortunately, this case is an old one. As a result, most of the news articles surrounding it are old ones (the agitators recent interest not withstanding), now in the Internet no-man’s-land of paid newspaper archives.

I’ve come up with an initial Clarion article, which mentions that the fellow Maye shot was the Police chief’s son.

And American Judicature Society list, which gives (about halfway down) a concise description of the case’s relevant points, and sites a few sources – all now archived.

None of these settle anything. They are just what I could find. I'm close to buying the articles, just for my personal edification, but will wait to see what y'all come up with in the way of alternate sources.