Monday, March 17, 2008

Get On Your Job

I've been reading Dilbert comics for a long time.

I am the product of a public education in Georgia.

I have worked for three state governments.

I have worked for a large, private corporation.

I have worked for many small buisnesses.

I have friends that have worked in many fields and many professions and told me about it.

I have family that have worked in many fields and many professions and told me about it.

I currently work in public education.

I currently reside in the city of New Orleans.

Having stated all the above facts, and without getting any more specific, all I have to say is two words:

True, true.

.

4 comments:

Leigh C. said...

"American financial sobriety" is quite the turn of phrase, especially considering where you (and I) live.

We are, financially speaking, a bunch of idiot drunks fer sure.

DADvocate said...

First, Bush's habit of bailing out every failing business removes the incentive to be competent. CEO's are often like NCAA coaches. They violate the rules at one college, the team an d college suffer but the coach simply moves on to another job without penalty. CEO's get much the same treatment with golden parachutes and such.

Secondly, affirmative action and other such diversity programs move competence from the front burner to the back burner.

Lastly, for now anyway, too many managers refuse to manage. I see this in my company. They expect employees to push issues, etc. They call it participatory management or management from the bottom up. Of course, they'll always push a few things and participatory management goes out the window then.

This makes for a confusing, demoralizing, frustrating, stressful, workplace. The company I work for is actually doing quite well which makes me wonder just how bad some of these other companies are managed.

The best boss I ever had was described more than once as "if he smiled his face would crack." He told each and every employee what he expected. The expectations were quite reasonable. If you met the expectations, you were given your raises, bonuses, etc. And he was always willing to listen to input, etc. But, he wasn't afraid to manage, take charge and be the bad guy if needed.

BTW - he was originally from Georgia.

Cousin Pat from Georgia said...

The analogy for CEO's and NCAA basketball coaches is nothing short of brilliant.

From experience, I would chalk a lot more of this up to your last point rather than your second. I don't quite know when managers went from being managers to weak meeting facilitators, but I do believe that was not the way to go. That's why comics like Dilbert and movies like Office Space are so funny (and so realistic). But again, that is my experience.

DADvocate said...

I don't quite know when managers went from being managers to weak meeting facilitators, but I do believe that was not the way to go.

Exactly. For a good example of a man who continually failed and made bad decisions but kept getting good jobs, check out the career of Robert McNamara.