Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Virtual Georgia

The 36th Georgia Blog Carnival is up and running over at Georgia On My Mind. Wow. Just looking at this stuff reminds me of how far the internet community in Georgia has come in 4 short years.

While I still haven't heard of Georgia bloggers holding their own conference, yet, I'm sure its just a matter of time.

Here's some links from the Carnival that I browsed already:

This one looks at how Lake Lanier has changed. The drought in Georgia is so bad, the need for downstream water is so great, and the inability to figure out what to do at a state level is so non-existent that the levels of water in Lake Lanier's outer reaches have plummeted. Also, there are apparently some USACOE mistakes that also have contributed, and earned the ire of the Governor.

Dante, what's your take on this, you being the boatmaster and all?

Also relevant to both Georigans and New Orleanians (considering the current immigration proposals in Baton Rouge) is this post about day laborers from South of the Border.



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2 comments:

Dante said...

"The drought in Georgia is so bad, the need for downstream water is so great, and the inability to figure out what to do at a state level is so non-existent that the levels of water in Lake Lanier's outer reaches have plummeted. Also, there are apparently some USACOE mistakes that also have contributed, and earned the ire of the Governor."

Here is what I know about Lanier:
1. None of the other Georgia lakes are nearly as low. Allatoona is darn near full, Hartwell is low but only by a few feet or so, Sinclair/Oconee is full, and there are no serious issues with lake levels in the many mountain lakes in North Georgia. Seems to me like if drought were the main factor, all lakes in Georgia would be just as low.

2. The population living off the Apalachicola River system (of which Lanier is a part) absolutely dwarfs the population of the Coosa River (Allatoona's system), the Oconee/Altamaha (Sinclair/Oconee), and the Savannah (Hartwell). Also, the Apalachicola runs through 3 states where the other systems run through one or two. I don't think it's a coincidence that the two major lakes in Georgia that have the most stable water levels (Oconee and Sinclair) are on river systems that begin and end in Georgia.

3. The mistake the Corps made on water level readings went on for months during the worst part of the drought and at a time when Buford Dam was already releasing way more water than usual due to the mussel issue. The error in reading water levels could've been resolved quickly if the Corps had actually bothered to check their equipment at all instead of writing off the many complaints from homeowners on the lake that were very familiar with where lake levels should be.

4. People who lived in shallow coves are no longer on lakefront property. People with real deep water still live on the lake. Their docks are still on land in many cases but that's not entirely uncommon for this time of year. The dock in that picture would be on dry land in the winter anyway.

5. Almost all of the Corps lake ramps on Lanier are open but finding on with a courtesy dock that's not sitting on dry land is still a bit of a rarity.

Ethan said...

Hey! Thanks for linking my post on your blog. It's actually increased traffic on my blog! Want me to do something else on Lake Lanier? You seem interested about Georgia and its topics.

And sort of a reply to the first comment: You're correct on the drought factor. Other lakes in Georgia aren't nearly as low as Lanier. The problems of Lanier aren't just droughts. It includes complete lack of interest in growing problems and the bad problem solving that ensued way too late into the problems.

I also agree on the second item. The other two states on the Chattahoochee, Alabama and Florida, demand too much water in relation to what Georgia already uses. Most of the water on the Chattahoochee in Georgia is used for hydroelectric power and drinking water. Florida wants the water for endangered mussels in the estuaries of the southern end of the river, and Alabamian barges ask for water for easier transportation. Metro Atlanta has already been reducing water consumption, things like no watering outdoor plants or no washing cars. Alabamians and Floridians are still able to do this.

Agree with #3 also. Not much to say there.

With the fourth point, I have something to add. Housing prices around Lake Lanier have acutally decreased because houses are no longer on the lake. I'm pretty sure tourism and other industries that depend on the lake have also bombed. Although metal detecting practices have shot up dramatically.

Ramps are open, but no one uses them. Who's going to ride a boat around a mud puddle? Debris and remains of the former farmland under the lake create hazards for boaters; you have to be careful or else a huge underwater tree stump can cut your boat in half.

Just my thoughts. Thanks again!