Wednesday, March 03, 2010

Shutting Georgia Down

At some point, the people who participate in the government of the several states need to grow up. So do the advocates, so do the voters. You simply cannot have cake and eat it, too. You usually cannot even do so during flush times. You definitely can't get away with it during a recession.

Government services have to be paid for. Yes, they cost money. You can either pay for the service, or cut the service. Sometimes you can scale back the service. In really bad times you have to pay more for a service that is scaling back at the same time.

I know doing so isn't popular, but at some point, you have to at least consider the least bad option. You can't just shout "NO" like an ornery two-year old about everything, even though I know that kind of behavior brought about short term "rewards" in the past.

But now, reality is rewarding us with this mess.

JMac at Beyond the Trestle sums it up thusly:

The ship's sinking, the Republicans are rearranging the deck chairs ... and the Democratic Party of Georgia wants to complain about where those chairs are being placed? It's unbelievable.


Yes. Yes it is.


Update: Please see also this illustration for graphic representation of this problem...

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1 comment:

Dante said...

Fact: In Georgia, colleges and universities don't actually get their budgets years in advance. They only get estimates. And they're usually very wrong.

Fact: Senator Seth Harp isn't trying to have his cake and eat it, too. He's very clearly stating that the government is cutting funding, and that the service will cost more as a result. The people who wrote the petition aren't trying to have their cake and eat it, too. They're clearly against the public funding cut along with being against the raise in tuition.

Fact: I've been part of these cost-cutting committees. The cutting of "core services" are generally scare tactics designed to keep money flowing in to blow on stupid things (like that server I had to reprice because my original estimate came in $4,000 too low).