Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Fruit of the Poisoned Tree

A little while back, I gave some expamples of why I find it difficult to relate to Republican voters, Republican elected officials, and those who carry water for Republicans on television, radio, and the internet. A big part of it has to do with how many Republicans these days focus on President Obama's religion and birth certificate instead of any substantive policy disagreements.

My point is, and will continue to be, that if someone continues to worry about the President being an Kenyan-anti-colonial Marxist Muslim, I'm going to have a very difficult time trusting them when they do finally get around to discussing the pros and cons of his actual policies.

Of course, many of my conservative friends are dismissive of this attitude. According to their logic, I should compartmentalize all the crazy stuff the crazy Republicans say and only pay attention when they are discussing real fiscal policy or taxes or how Obama's policies cost American jobs; my distrust should reset depending on what issue is under discussion.

Which (I think) is why Dante asked:

What have elected officials actually done that make you think what the right-wingery says about Obama's religious views are even an issue? I'm not looking for words. I'm looking for action.


It doesn't specifically deal with Obama's religion, but I tend to equate the "Obama-is-a-Muslim" delusion with the "Obama-Wasn't-Born-In-The-United-States" fantasy. That might be splitting rhetorical hairs, but I'd wager that a significant percentage of individuals who think one think the other.

Which is why my distrust of Republican elected officials continues when I see that 94 of them in the Georgia House are proposing legislation to check each Presidential candidate's birth certificate.

Oh, and you'll never guess who one of them is.

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2 comments:

Dante said...

"Of course, many of my conservative friends are dismissive of this attitude. According to their logic, I should compartmentalize all the crazy stuff the crazy Republicans say and only pay attention when they are discussing real fiscal policy or taxes or how Obama's policies cost American jobs; my distrust should reset depending on what issue is under discussion."

No, I personally don't think it's important when they're discussing policy or taxes either. I only think it's important what they do. They can say whatever they want. I hope I never relate to the scum of the earth that are supposed to be representing us in Washington. If I do, then my life has taken a turn for the worse or I'm buying into some serious lies.

But politically speaking, I think the new birth certificate requirement is a shrewd move. They win either way. Either Obama ends up in some sort of pickle over it (highly unlikely IMHO) or Republicans just shrug it off and claim Obama was dragging his feet over it.

Cousin Pat from Georgia said...

First of all, their words and what they say - even with no action attached - have direct and powerful influences on American culture.

Going further, I try to take in all they say and all they do. If their words and actions don't reconcile, that tells you what kind of people these are. If they're talking crazy and then acting crazy, that tells me just as much.

Right now, a lot of Republicans have given up on any pretense of conservatism and are whole-hog into irrational fear-based marketing.

Thus, when they talk of conspiracy theories and then act on those theories, that tells me all I need to know about them. If they can get this so badly wrong, what else do they get wrong? If they take action based on imaginary threats, what other actions will they take based on nothing more than the ravings of talk-radio hosts?